State health officials on Monday announced a national outbreak of Salmonella which is linked to an eastern New Mexico hatchery that sells live baby chickens, ducks and other poultry by mail and supplies them to feed stores.

According to the state Health department officials, more than 300 people in 37 states were infected by Salmonella at Privett Hatchery duck pen in Portales.

Salmonella outbreak at Privett Hatchery, New Mexico
By the numbers given by the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, there have been 51 people hospitalised while no deaths have been reported so far. Nearly three fifths of the infected are children of aged 10 and below. Baby chickens are generally bought as pets early on and later to raise these birds for eggs and meat.

The question about which hatchery has caused the outbreak has yet not been confirmed, however Paul Ettestad, state public health veterinarian said the hatchery was the most likely to cause the outbreak. Though there have been several infected with Salmonella who had purchased baby poultry from 113 other feed store locations that was supplied by 18 mail order hatcheries in several states.

According to the CDC, testing about which hatchery actually caused the outbreak is still in progress. In a statement given by the Privett Hatchery on its official website, it clearly mentions that some of the Salmonella cases may be linked to its operation and is going to cooperate with the state and the federal officials during its further investigation.

The department announced that certain measurements shall be taken by the hatchery of not selling any poultry from its pen where even a minute amount of Salmonella strain was found. Administration of vaccine to all its birds along with brochures listing the safe handling procedures of baby poultry shall be delivered to all of its shipments.

Salmonella cases across the country
The number of Salmonella cases all across the world from Califonia to Newyork have been reported according to CDC since March this year. 37 cases have been reported from Colorado while Texas stands next with 32 cases.

In order to prevent further infections to spread, the department has issued severe instructions to handle poultry. The Salmonella infections can usually occur when baby chicks are brought home and have been handled by children.

The department has strictly suggested to watch hands thoroughly after handling live poultry and also cleanse the area thoroughly where they roam around.

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